I have never seen the splits used in a belly dance show quite to this extent!

Got 40 seconds of choreography you need to fill?

I would never have thought of this:)

I have some exciting new plans for this blog including a gift for you my lovely readers coming soon- stay tuned! In my research for my upcoming plans, I came across this belly dance video. I have no idea of who the dancer is (if you know please comment below), and she is an attractive lass and very flexible but that is maybe a little excessive use of the splits. What do you think?

 

Video

New Snake Tattoo!

Oohhh! An easier way to belly dance with a snake – Just Henna one on :) . I can see this working in anything from tribal fusion to a snaky cabaret number. This blog post is by a young, local henna enthusiast that is constantly experimenting with original and different designs. She is available at most Bellingen markets. I love supporting our youths creative endeavours.

Living Henna

Hey this is my new tattoo it is the snake of change! I actually really like it! It was inspired by my two amazing cousins!

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Do certain instruments encourage the same belly dance moves in all dancers?

As a scientist and a belly dancer I am always interested in the latest dance related studies and surveys.

Have you ever wondered if certain sounds illicit the same motivations to move for all dancers? I am sure you have noticed that big, deep drum beats tend to get big, juicy, earthy moves from most people. I guess Keti Sharif was wondering this too as she recently added a pdf on her survey on this very topic. She had the aim

 “to observe any recurring patterns of natural movement response to each instrument, to establish predominant music-movement relationships and characteristics of movement value”.

To read the complete findings, you can easily obtain a copy through the lovely Keti Sharif’s website.does the music effect the dance?

But here is a little taste of what was discovered from the 836 participants:-

Ney elicited an overwhelming preference for upper body movement and arms at shoulder level or above head.

Oud tended to elicit lower body responses  with rolling and vibrating movements interspersed, and the arms were moving between chest and hip level – possibly as a response to scale.

“The survey demonstrates that in many cases, the area of the body and movement of the musician to hold instrument and create sound (eg: strumming, stroking, wavering or plucking types of movement), is often reflected intuitively through dance, in the same, or at least a close or nearby area of the dancer’s body.”

This is a very cool bit of insight into human nature and sound. I thank all participants and the Keti for putting this together. It is worth a look for all sorts of reasons but could be particularly valuable to teachers, those interested in dancing to live music or those that have trouble with improvisation.

Do you know of any other studies on dance or belly dance that you have found useful? Please share the links below.

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